Foo Fighters Foo Fighters

Belgian Albums Ultratop Wallonia [56]. Melody Foo Fighters Foo Fighters. When a concept thus grows out of anecdotes cemented together with practical necessity, it is bound to acquire elements of mystery. This project pioneered the study of aviators' vertigo and was initiated because a wide variety of anomalous events were being reported by nighttime aviators. The objects were variously described as fiery, and glowing red, white, or orange. Grohl and Jones Foo Fighters Foo Fighters the record across a period of one week in Octoberwith Grohl on vocals and all instruments.

Upon its release, Foo Fighters earned positive reviews, praising its songwriting and performances, and was also a commercial success, becoming the band's second-best-selling album in the United States. Following the death of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain in April , drummer Dave Grohl entered a state of depression, [4] and found it difficult to both listen to music and play instruments.

After enjoying the performance, Grohl figured he could do his own musical project, [8] which could work as "some sort of cathartic therapy, to go out and record these songs that I'd written by myself.

Grohl and Jones produced the record across a period of one week in October , with Grohl on vocals and all instruments. Both would arrive in the morning at Robert Lang Studios, start production by noon and do four songs a day. The only performance by an outsider was a guitar part on "X-Static" provided by Greg Dulli of The Afghan Whigs , who was watching Grohl record the songs.

Grohl eventually asked him if he wanted to play and handed him a guitar. The only song that required two run-throughs before completion was " I'll Stick Around ".

That album the vocals are quadrupled. In an attempt to keep his anonymity, Grohl planned to release the songs under the name Foo Fighters. Kids would come up to me and say 'Nirvana was my favourite band' and I'd say 'well here, have this'".

A deal was eventually signed to Capitol Records , as president Gary Gersh was a personal friend of Grohl ever since he worked on Nirvana's label Geffen Records.

The mixing sessions of the album began in Robert Lang Studios which were used on the tapes Grohl gave away but eventually those mixes were discarded and the sessions moved to Rob Schnapf and Tom Rothrock 's "The Shop" studio in Arcata, California.

A Stephen's 24 track 2" tape machine was used for playback. Processors used in the mixes included an Eventide Omnipressor compressor for vocals and guitar solos, an Alan Smart stereo compressor for "squashing" the drums and mixing them back in as well as being used over the entire mix. Mixes were "nothing that crazy" Rob described, adding that he "mixed ' Big Me ' in 20 minutes". The performance was followed by an invitation to be a full-time member of the Heartbreakers, but once Petty heard about the Foo Fighters, he instead encouraged Grohl to move on with this solo project.

Nine of the songs in the album were composed before or during Grohl's tenure with Nirvana, and existed in demos created by Grohl on his home 8-track tape recorder. Most of the lyrics on Foo Fighters are nonsensical lines written by Grohl in the 20 minutes before recording began.

I was just concentrating on everything being as together as possible, having everything be tight and in sync. There wasn't too much time spent sitting in a chair thinking. Now I look at them and some of them seem to actually have meaning", [6] [17] and revealed that a few songs have lyrics inspired by "personal experiences of the last four or five years", with the standout being " Big Me ", an "out-and-out love song" to Grohl's then-wife Jennifer Youngblood that he described as his favorite track on the album.

It's really a completely separate thing. Dave wasn't even conscious of that. In spring , Foo Fighters embarked on their first ever United States tour, supporting Mike Watt along with fellow tour newbies Hovercraft , whose line-up included Vedder at the time. As well as performing with their own bands, Grohl and Vedder each picked up a role as a member of Watt's backing band throughout the tour, supplying drums and guitar respectively.

The band promoted the release that summer by completing another US tour with Wool and Shudder to Think , with 25 concerts in little over a month. Afterwards, the band played several of their largest shows up to that point, making their debut on the European festival circuit with performances at Pukkelpop , Reading and Lowlands.

That fall, the band continued to tour extensively, [21] with a European tour with Built to Spill , [22] and visits to Japan, Australia and New Zealand. The Foo Fighters performed nearly concerts throughout , and over 70 dates the following year. Foo Fighters earned mostly positive reviews upon release. Many critics compared the album to Grohl's previous band, Nirvana. The album received minor criticism for its lack of intensity, which many proposed was due to the fact that Grohl played all the instruments himself.

AllMusic reviewer Stephen Thomas Erlewine wrote, "Since he recorded the album by himself, they aren't as powerful as most band's primal sonic workouts, but the results are damn impressive for a solo musician. Foo Fighters was a commercial success. In the United States, it debuted at the Billboard on number twenty-three, with first-week sales of 40, units.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the band article, see Foo Fighters. Foo Fighters. Alternative rock grunge [1] post-grunge [2] punk rock [3]. Roswell Capitol.

Barrett Jones Dave Grohl. I was just fucking around. Some of the lyrics weren't even real words. I'll Stick Around. Sample of " I'll Stick Around ", the album's second single.

Dave Grohl described it as "a very negative song about feeling you were violated or deprived" and considered "it the strongest song I've ever written, because it was the one song that I actually meant and felt emotionally.

The A. Retrieved January 3, Retrieved July 14, Back and Forth documentary. Classic Rock. The Dave Grohl Story. Music Sales Group. Rolling Stone. Melody Maker. Dave Grohl: Nothing to Lose. Retrieved Rock: the rough guide. Rough Guides. Retrieved April 17, New York 68 : 88— Chicago Tribune.

Retrieved November 18, Entertainment Weekly. New York. London: June 24, London : August In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian eds. Retrieved January 7, London 62 : The Village Voice. Christgau's Consumer Guide: Albums of the '90s. January 4, Archived from the original on December 7, The term foo fighter was used by Allied aircraft pilots in World War II to describe various UFOs or mysterious aerial phenomena seen in the skies over both the European and Pacific theaters of operations.

Though "foo fighter" initially described a type of UFO reported and named by the U. The Robertson Panel explored possible explanations, for instance that they were electrostatic phenomena similar to St. Elmo's fire , electromagnetic phenomena, or simply reflections of light from ice crystals. The nonsense word " foo " emerged in popular culture during the early s, first being used by cartoonist Bill Holman , who peppered his Smokey Stover [3] fireman cartoon strips with "foo" signs and puns.

Meiers, who it is agreed by most th members gave the foo fighters their name. Meiers was from Chicago and was an avid reader of Holman's strip, which was run daily in the Chicago Tribune. Smokey Stover's catch-phrase was "where there's foo, there's fire". In a mission debriefing on the evening of November 27, , Fritz Ringwald, the unit's S-2 Intelligence Officer, stated that Meiers and Ed Schleuter had sighted a red ball of fire that appeared to chase them through a variety of high-speed maneuvers.

Fritz said that Meiers was extremely agitated and had a copy of the comic strip tucked in his back pocket. He pulled it out and slammed it down on Fritz's desk and said, "[I]t was another one of those fuckin' foo fighters!

According to Ringwald, because of the lack of a better name, it stuck. And this was originally what the men of the th started calling these incidents: "fuckin' foo fighters". In December , a press correspondent from the Associated Press in Paris, Bob Wilson, was sent to the th at their base outside of Dijon , France, to investigate this story.

The squadron commander, Capt. Harold Augsperger, also decided to sanitize the term to "foo fighters" in the historical data of the squadron. The first sightings occurred in November , when pilots flying over Western Europe by night reported seeing fast-moving round glowing objects following their aircraft.

The objects were variously described as fiery, and glowing red, white, or orange. Some pilots described them as resembling Christmas-tree lights and reported that they seemed to toy with the aircraft, making wild turns before simply vanishing.

Pilots and aircrew reported that the objects flew formation with their aircraft and behaved as if they were under intelligent control, but never displayed hostile behavior.

However, they could not be outmaneuvered or shot down. The phenomenon was so widespread that the lights earned a name — in the European Theater of Operations they were often called "Kraut fireballs", but for the most part called "foo fighters".

The military took the sightings seriously, suspecting that the mysterious sightings might be secret German weapons, but further investigation revealed that German and Japanese pilots had reported similar sightings. On 13 December , the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force in Paris issued a press release, which was featured in the New York Times the next day, officially describing the phenomenon as a "new German weapon".

In its 15 January edition, Time magazine carried a story entitled "Foo-Fighter", in which it reported that the "balls of fire" had been following USAAF nightfighters for over a month, and that the pilots had named it the "foo-fighter". According to Time , descriptions of the phenomena varied, but the pilots agreed that the mysterious lights followed their aircraft closely at high speed.

The "balls of fire" phenomenon reported from the Pacific Theater of Operations differed somewhat from the foo fighters reported from Europe; the "ball of fire" resembled a large burning sphere which "just hung in the sky", though it was reported to sometimes follow aircraft. There was speculation that the phenomena could be related to the Japanese fire balloon campaign. As with the European foo fighters, no aircraft were reported as having been attacked by a "ball of fire". The postwar Robertson Panel cited foo fighter reports, noting that their behavior did not appear to be threatening, and mentioned possible explanations, for instance that they were electrostatic phenomena similar to St.

The Panel's report suggested that "If the term 'flying saucers' had been popular in —, these objects would have been so labeled. Foo fighters were reported on many occasions from around the world; a few examples are noted below. Vesco claims that the foo fighters were in fact a form of ground-launched, automatically guided, jet-propelled flak mine called the Feuerball Fireball.

This device, supposedly operated by special SS units, resembled a tortoise shell in shape, and it flew by means of gas jets that spun like a Catherine wheel around the fuselage. Miniature klystron tubes inside the device, in combination with the gas jets, created the characteristic glowing spheroid appearance of the foo fighters.

A crude form of collision avoidance radar ensured the craft would not crash into another airborne object, and an onboard sensor mechanism would even instruct the machine to depart swiftly if it was fired upon. The purpose of the Feuerball , according to Vesco, was twofold.

Dave Grohl wrote and recorded the entire album himself, apart from a guest guitar spot by Greg Dulli , with the assistance of producer Barrett Jones at Robert Lang Studios in Seattle , Washington , in He claimed that he recorded the album just for fun, describing it as a cathartic experience to recover from the death of Nirvana bandmate Kurt Cobain. After Grohl completed the recordings, he chose the name "Foo Fighters" for the project to hide his identity, and passed cassettes copies of the sessions to personal friends.

When the tapes attracted record label interest, Grohl signed with Capitol and recruited a full band to perform the songs live. The album was promoted through extensive tours and six singles, two of which received music videos. Upon its release, Foo Fighters earned positive reviews, praising its songwriting and performances, and was also a commercial success, becoming the band's second-best-selling album in the United States.

Following the death of Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain in April , drummer Dave Grohl entered a state of depression, [4] and found it difficult to both listen to music and play instruments. After enjoying the performance, Grohl figured he could do his own musical project, [8] which could work as "some sort of cathartic therapy, to go out and record these songs that I'd written by myself.

Grohl and Jones produced the record across a period of one week in October , with Grohl on vocals and all instruments. Both would arrive in the morning at Robert Lang Studios, start production by noon and do four songs a day. The only performance by an outsider was a guitar part on "X-Static" provided by Greg Dulli of The Afghan Whigs , who was watching Grohl record the songs. Grohl eventually asked him if he wanted to play and handed him a guitar.

The only song that required two run-throughs before completion was " I'll Stick Around ". That album the vocals are quadrupled. In an attempt to keep his anonymity, Grohl planned to release the songs under the name Foo Fighters. Kids would come up to me and say 'Nirvana was my favourite band' and I'd say 'well here, have this'". A deal was eventually signed to Capitol Records , as president Gary Gersh was a personal friend of Grohl ever since he worked on Nirvana's label Geffen Records.

The mixing sessions of the album began in Robert Lang Studios which were used on the tapes Grohl gave away but eventually those mixes were discarded and the sessions moved to Rob Schnapf and Tom Rothrock 's "The Shop" studio in Arcata, California.

A Stephen's 24 track 2" tape machine was used for playback. Processors used in the mixes included an Eventide Omnipressor compressor for vocals and guitar solos, an Alan Smart stereo compressor for "squashing" the drums and mixing them back in as well as being used over the entire mix. Mixes were "nothing that crazy" Rob described, adding that he "mixed ' Big Me ' in 20 minutes". The performance was followed by an invitation to be a full-time member of the Heartbreakers, but once Petty heard about the Foo Fighters, he instead encouraged Grohl to move on with this solo project.

Nine of the songs in the album were composed before or during Grohl's tenure with Nirvana, and existed in demos created by Grohl on his home 8-track tape recorder. Most of the lyrics on Foo Fighters are nonsensical lines written by Grohl in the 20 minutes before recording began. I was just concentrating on everything being as together as possible, having everything be tight and in sync.

There wasn't too much time spent sitting in a chair thinking. Now I look at them and some of them seem to actually have meaning", [6] [17] and revealed that a few songs have lyrics inspired by "personal experiences of the last four or five years", with the standout being " Big Me ", an "out-and-out love song" to Grohl's then-wife Jennifer Youngblood that he described as his favorite track on the album. It's really a completely separate thing.

Dave wasn't even conscious of that. In spring , Foo Fighters embarked on their first ever United States tour, supporting Mike Watt along with fellow tour newbies Hovercraft , whose line-up included Vedder at the time. As well as performing with their own bands, Grohl and Vedder each picked up a role as a member of Watt's backing band throughout the tour, supplying drums and guitar respectively.

The band promoted the release that summer by completing another US tour with Wool and Shudder to Think , with 25 concerts in little over a month. Afterwards, the band played several of their largest shows up to that point, making their debut on the European festival circuit with performances at Pukkelpop , Reading and Lowlands.

That fall, the band continued to tour extensively, [21] with a European tour with Built to Spill , [22] and visits to Japan, Australia and New Zealand. The Foo Fighters performed nearly concerts throughout , and over 70 dates the following year.

Foo Fighters earned mostly positive reviews upon release. Many critics compared the album to Grohl's previous band, Nirvana. The album received minor criticism for its lack of intensity, which many proposed was due to the fact that Grohl played all the instruments himself.

AllMusic reviewer Stephen Thomas Erlewine wrote, "Since he recorded the album by himself, they aren't as powerful as most band's primal sonic workouts, but the results are damn impressive for a solo musician.

Foo Fighters was a commercial success. In the United States, it debuted at the Billboard on number twenty-three, with first-week sales of 40, units. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. For the band article, see Foo Fighters.

Foo Fighters. Alternative rock grunge [1] post-grunge [2] punk rock [3]. Roswell Capitol. Barrett Jones Dave Grohl. I was just fucking around. Some of the lyrics weren't even real words. I'll Stick Around. Sample of " I'll Stick Around ", the album's second single. Dave Grohl described it as "a very negative song about feeling you were violated or deprived" and considered "it the strongest song I've ever written, because it was the one song that I actually meant and felt emotionally.

The A. Retrieved January 3, Retrieved July 14, Back and Forth documentary. Classic Rock. The Dave Grohl Story. Music Sales Group. Rolling Stone. Melody Maker. Dave Grohl: Nothing to Lose. Retrieved Rock: the rough guide. Rough Guides. Retrieved April 17, New York 68 : 88— Chicago Tribune.

Retrieved November 18, Entertainment Weekly. New York. London: June 24, London : August In Brackett, Nathan; Hoard, Christian eds. Retrieved January 7, Meiers was from Chicago and was an avid reader of Holman's strip, which was run daily in the Chicago Tribune. Smokey Stover's catch-phrase was "where there's foo, there's fire". In a mission debriefing on the evening of November 27, , Fritz Ringwald, the unit's S-2 Intelligence Officer, stated that Meiers and Ed Schleuter had sighted a red ball of fire that appeared to chase them through a variety of high-speed maneuvers.

Fritz said that Meiers was extremely agitated and had a copy of the comic strip tucked in his back pocket. He pulled it out and slammed it down on Fritz's desk and said, "[I]t was another one of those fuckin' foo fighters!

According to Ringwald, because of the lack of a better name, it stuck. And this was originally what the men of the th started calling these incidents: "fuckin' foo fighters". In December , a press correspondent from the Associated Press in Paris, Bob Wilson, was sent to the th at their base outside of Dijon , France, to investigate this story.

The squadron commander, Capt. Harold Augsperger, also decided to sanitize the term to "foo fighters" in the historical data of the squadron. The first sightings occurred in November , when pilots flying over Western Europe by night reported seeing fast-moving round glowing objects following their aircraft. The objects were variously described as fiery, and glowing red, white, or orange. Some pilots described them as resembling Christmas-tree lights and reported that they seemed to toy with the aircraft, making wild turns before simply vanishing.

Pilots and aircrew reported that the objects flew formation with their aircraft and behaved as if they were under intelligent control, but never displayed hostile behavior. However, they could not be outmaneuvered or shot down. The phenomenon was so widespread that the lights earned a name — in the European Theater of Operations they were often called "Kraut fireballs", but for the most part called "foo fighters".

The military took the sightings seriously, suspecting that the mysterious sightings might be secret German weapons, but further investigation revealed that German and Japanese pilots had reported similar sightings. On 13 December , the Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force in Paris issued a press release, which was featured in the New York Times the next day, officially describing the phenomenon as a "new German weapon".

In its 15 January edition, Time magazine carried a story entitled "Foo-Fighter", in which it reported that the "balls of fire" had been following USAAF nightfighters for over a month, and that the pilots had named it the "foo-fighter". According to Time , descriptions of the phenomena varied, but the pilots agreed that the mysterious lights followed their aircraft closely at high speed. The "balls of fire" phenomenon reported from the Pacific Theater of Operations differed somewhat from the foo fighters reported from Europe; the "ball of fire" resembled a large burning sphere which "just hung in the sky", though it was reported to sometimes follow aircraft.

There was speculation that the phenomena could be related to the Japanese fire balloon campaign. As with the European foo fighters, no aircraft were reported as having been attacked by a "ball of fire".

The postwar Robertson Panel cited foo fighter reports, noting that their behavior did not appear to be threatening, and mentioned possible explanations, for instance that they were electrostatic phenomena similar to St.

The Panel's report suggested that "If the term 'flying saucers' had been popular in —, these objects would have been so labeled. Foo fighters were reported on many occasions from around the world; a few examples are noted below.

Vesco claims that the foo fighters were in fact a form of ground-launched, automatically guided, jet-propelled flak mine called the Feuerball Fireball.

This device, supposedly operated by special SS units, resembled a tortoise shell in shape, and it flew by means of gas jets that spun like a Catherine wheel around the fuselage. Miniature klystron tubes inside the device, in combination with the gas jets, created the characteristic glowing spheroid appearance of the foo fighters. A crude form of collision avoidance radar ensured the craft would not crash into another airborne object, and an onboard sensor mechanism would even instruct the machine to depart swiftly if it was fired upon.

The purpose of the Feuerball , according to Vesco, was twofold. The appearance of this weird device inside a bomber stream would and indeed did have a distracting and disruptive effect on the bomber pilots. Also, Vesco alleges that the devices were also intended to have an "offensive" capability. Electrostatic discharges from the klystron tubes would, he stated, interfere with the ignition systems of the engines of the bombers, causing the planes to crash.

Any type of electrical discharge from the wings of airplanes see St. Elmo's Fire has been suggested as an explanation, since it has been known to appear at the wingtips of aircraft. During April , the U.