J S Bach Keith Jarrett Das Wohltemperierte Klavier Buch I

Add to Wishlist. Hidden fields. If I have a criticism to make of Jarrett's Bach playing, it is that rhythmically he errs on the side of caution, seldom if ever allowing himself that degree of latitude—an effective and important aspect of style—favoured by more seasoned harpsichordists. Keith Jarrett. Keith Jarrett Albums. No End. Rio, it seems, is as much a state of mind as a geographical location.

I part company with him in a mild way over his execution of the grace-note in the three places where it occurs in this same Prelude; but he is in the best company, with players like Davitt Moroney Harmonia Mundi offering the same solution.

But, as I implied earlier on, these are performances which are likely to give enduring pleasure, above all, perhaps, for Jarrett's awareness of the music's poetic content. There is a serenity and a sensibility in his playing of the E major Prelude and Fugue, for example, which convey variously the grandeur, the delicate tracery and the poetry of Bach's music while also underlining its timelessness. In short, an impressive and mainly satisfying release which stands up to comparison with the many fine performances currently available.

My first choices remain Moroney harpsichord , Tilney clavichord, Book 1; harpsichord, Book 2 , Gilbert harpsichord and Edwin Fischer piano—EMI , but Jarrett's interpretation is not far behind in my affection and esteem.

A fine release. Jontowel 19 de junio de , Jontowel 23 de junio de , Suscribirse a: Enviar comentarios Atom. Samuel Barber: Piano Concerto, Op. Keith Jarrett. Last Dance. Last Dance is a joint album by American pianist and composer Keith Jarrett and American jazz double bass player Charlie Haden known for their long collaboration from the s onward.

The duo had a joint album Jasmine in No End. No End is a one-man-band instrumental album by American pianist and composer Keith Jarrett, where he performs all the parts through overdubbing between "two Tandberg cassette recorders".

Due to its way of recording and musical style it can be seen as part of his experimental circle, along with the early folk rock Restoration Ruin or the tribal Spirits. As usual with his solo albums, Jarrett improvised all tracks, but unusually, he mainly used electric guitars, Fender bass guitar, tablas, drums and assorted percussion; he also includes some voice, and his primary instrument, piano.

The recording was done during at Cavelight Studio, Jarrett's home studio in New Jersey, but released in , with Jarrett concluding his liner notes on, "How could I have left it in a drawer all these years? Michelle Makarski. Keith Jarrett is acclaimed for his completely improvised solo concerts where he sits down at the piano and pulls unwritten songs out of the air.

This document of a performance in Brazil shows the breadth of Jarrett's playing and his unbelievable skill as an "instant" composer. The untitled pieces run the gamut from introspective and spare to downright funky and thumping, but overall the mood is lighter and sunnier — often flat-out joyous, with Jarrett's familiar Frankenstein grunts in full force — than his more stately solo concert recordings.

Rio, it seems, is as much a state of mind as a geographical location. The Out-Of-Towners. Keith Jarrett Trio. It was recorded during his bout with chronic fatigue syndrome and was dedicated to Jarrett's second and then-wife, Rose Anne: "For Rose Anne, who heard the music, then gave it back to me". I'd just had my Hamburg Steinway overhauled and wanted to try it out, and I have my studio right next to the house, so if I woke up and had a half-decent day, I would turn on the tape recorder and play for a few minutes.

I was too fatigued to do more. Then something started to click with the mike placement, the new action of the instrument, I could play so soft,

This is demonstrated in the lovely E flat Prelude, where I distinctly hear Jarrett doing a Glenn Gould and humming along—a good sign rather than a bad one, I always feel.

I part company with him in a mild way over his execution of the grace-note in the three places where it occurs in this same Prelude; but he is in the best company, with players like Davitt Moroney Harmonia Mundi offering the same solution. But, as I implied earlier on, these are performances which are likely to give enduring pleasure, above all, perhaps, for Jarrett's awareness of the music's poetic content.

There is a serenity and a sensibility in his playing of the E major Prelude and Fugue, for example, which convey variously the grandeur, the delicate tracery and the poetry of Bach's music while also underlining its timelessness. In short, an impressive and mainly satisfying release which stands up to comparison with the many fine performances currently available.

My first choices remain Moroney harpsichord , Tilney clavichord, Book 1; harpsichord, Book 2 , Gilbert harpsichord and Edwin Fischer piano—EMI , but Jarrett's interpretation is not far behind in my affection and esteem. A fine release. Jontowel 19 de junio de , Jontowel 23 de junio de , Jacques Loussier Jazz Trio vs. Walter Gieseking Compare 3 Versions. Keller Quartett. Pierre Boulez. Das wohltemperierte Klavier 2. Friedrich Gulda. Mompou: Complete Piano Works.

Federico Mompou. Keith Jarrett Albums. Samuel Barber: Piano Concerto, Op. Keith Jarrett. Last Dance. Last Dance is a joint album by American pianist and composer Keith Jarrett and American jazz double bass player Charlie Haden known for their long collaboration from the s onward.

The duo had a joint album Jasmine in No End. No End is a one-man-band instrumental album by American pianist and composer Keith Jarrett, where he performs all the parts through overdubbing between "two Tandberg cassette recorders". Due to its way of recording and musical style it can be seen as part of his experimental circle, along with the early folk rock Restoration Ruin or the tribal Spirits.

As usual with his solo albums, Jarrett improvised all tracks, but unusually, he mainly used electric guitars, Fender bass guitar, tablas, drums and assorted percussion; he also includes some voice, and his primary instrument, piano. The recording was done during at Cavelight Studio, Jarrett's home studio in New Jersey, but released in , with Jarrett concluding his liner notes on, "How could I have left it in a drawer all these years?

Michelle Makarski. Keith Jarrett is acclaimed for his completely improvised solo concerts where he sits down at the piano and pulls unwritten songs out of the air. This document of a performance in Brazil shows the breadth of Jarrett's playing and his unbelievable skill as an "instant" composer.