Kenny Dixon Jr Feat Norma Jeane Bell Moodymann EP

Love playing this track as it always gets the crowd moving. The swing, the filters, they all come from each other, from hip-hop to house to jazz. Kenny Dixon Jr, feat. The remix of I'm the Baddest Bitch starts the album off with a lovely jazzy walking bass line and brings a new light onto this classic. I was like 23 or

With the signature mumbling samples and other abstract sounds that Moodymann is renowned for, this album is brilliant. But the main reason for its brilliance is the beauty of Norma Jean Bell's voice - it has to be heard to be believed! Then there is her superb sax and keyboard skills not to mention the inspirational musicianship of the other musicians. It's always good to hear a really intelligent and innovative house album out of Detroit, this is no exception.

One of Those Nites 3. Dreams 4. Do You Wanna Party? Nobody 7. Mystery 8. So Kai just walked up to me, took a listen to my music and then he took me to his spot. I started playing keyboards on his stuff, he introduced me to house music, and that's basically how the whole thing got started, really. I went up there and stayed for a year. A lot of people thought I was producing house music because they tie that with Detroit, but I was up there working with Eminem's producer Denaun Porter from D I was just kind of doing work with him on a mainstream level, making hip-hop.

I can't say it helped me, but you know how the industry is. It gave me a lesson. I was just motivated to come Detroit anyway because my main influence always was J Dilla. Motown too. I'm from the South, and I come up there and heard more people trying to rap, and it left me tripping. From my age, I'm thinking, the young people up there are going to take this thing like a torch, like "yeah, we're from Motown" but I guess they look at it different.

I was talking to Kyle Hall and he said the only time it really jumps is during the festival. The music you are making right now, and the music on the mix, is a great combination of jazz and house music.

Can you walk me through how you approach combining them? Since Herbie Hancock is a huge influence, you already know where that came from — it came from " Maiden Voyage. If I am playing with just a drummer, or with guys I don't know and we just in front of each other and we playing, it's like I am vibing and improvising.

To me, that ties together house music and jazz. I know some people don't think about it like that, but it's all improvising. Like a horn player. That's just what I did.

Kai made the rhythm and I used that same vibe from "Maiden Voyage" to blend it in together and gave it more of a house groove. Everybody approaches it differently.

Even with artists like Moodymann and the chords people are using or sampling from the MPC — those emotional chords are all jazz and fusion chords.

The swing, the filters, they all come from each other, from hip-hop to house to jazz. I think they're all tied-in together.

That's my approach: I'm jamming. Some people loop stuff around, and keep looping. But when I play on a track, I play it like a jazz track, all the way through without making changes. I think that's what put me in a certain lane and it kind of stands out. I like playing with bands.

I don't know what it is. Sometimes it could be a jam session and afterwards I can go back and create a track off just vibing with band members. So it is an influence, I love doing it. The musicians that I jam with are not that well known. There's only one whose name may be recognizable — Rasheeda Ali, she's done work with different jazz musicians and gone overseas. Otherwise, people I jam with are like It's kind of like we just do it for the love. They're not people in the game or work in music, they're just friends and people who get together and play.

I am, right now, working on getting at least a three-piece band together. Because currently I am working on a release for Brownswood, Gilles Petersen's label, and that is gonna be in the style of the " Chameleon. Like "Aquarian Voyage. That's what I have been doing overseas. Kind of like a Patrick Adams -type of vibe. Who else would you say has made an impression on you in the world where jazz and house meet?

Theo inspired me on I can't really even say what perspective. As I said, it was really late when I got introduced to house music. That was my introduction. Some house DJs I see, they have to play house non-stop — if they switch up, they can't do that, especially if they've got a huge crowd who just want their dance tempo, if you get what I'm saying.

Theo, though, started just playing straight-ahead jazz, and the crowd, all young people, was going crazy. I never saw nothing like that. And then he went on to play fusion, then more house, he was just playing all over the place.

The thing about Theo is he takes chances, he don't care. That's what I like, that's what motivates me. I've been doing something with Alexander Nut and Eglo Records. I been working on some stuff with Funkineven, and given it to him. But my motivation has been coming from Kyle Hall and them. They've been motivating me to start my own label; so I've just been working on my own music, preparing myself to start a label somewhere in the future.

Then there is her superb sax and keyboard skills not to mention the inspirational musicianship of the other musicians. It's always good to hear a really intelligent and innovative house album out of Detroit, this is no exception.

One of Those Nites 3. Dreams 4. Do You Wanna Party? Nobody 7. Mystery 8. Your Perfect 9. Feel What I Feel I started playing keyboards on his stuff, he introduced me to house music, and that's basically how the whole thing got started, really. I went up there and stayed for a year. A lot of people thought I was producing house music because they tie that with Detroit, but I was up there working with Eminem's producer Denaun Porter from D I was just kind of doing work with him on a mainstream level, making hip-hop.

I can't say it helped me, but you know how the industry is. It gave me a lesson. I was just motivated to come Detroit anyway because my main influence always was J Dilla.

Motown too. I'm from the South, and I come up there and heard more people trying to rap, and it left me tripping. From my age, I'm thinking, the young people up there are going to take this thing like a torch, like "yeah, we're from Motown" but I guess they look at it different.

I was talking to Kyle Hall and he said the only time it really jumps is during the festival. The music you are making right now, and the music on the mix, is a great combination of jazz and house music.

Can you walk me through how you approach combining them? Since Herbie Hancock is a huge influence, you already know where that came from — it came from " Maiden Voyage. If I am playing with just a drummer, or with guys I don't know and we just in front of each other and we playing, it's like I am vibing and improvising.

To me, that ties together house music and jazz. I know some people don't think about it like that, but it's all improvising. Like a horn player. That's just what I did. Kai made the rhythm and I used that same vibe from "Maiden Voyage" to blend it in together and gave it more of a house groove. Everybody approaches it differently. Even with artists like Moodymann and the chords people are using or sampling from the MPC — those emotional chords are all jazz and fusion chords.

The swing, the filters, they all come from each other, from hip-hop to house to jazz. I think they're all tied-in together. That's my approach: I'm jamming. Some people loop stuff around, and keep looping. But when I play on a track, I play it like a jazz track, all the way through without making changes. I think that's what put me in a certain lane and it kind of stands out.

I like playing with bands. I don't know what it is. Sometimes it could be a jam session and afterwards I can go back and create a track off just vibing with band members. So it is an influence, I love doing it. The musicians that I jam with are not that well known.

There's only one whose name may be recognizable — Rasheeda Ali, she's done work with different jazz musicians and gone overseas. Otherwise, people I jam with are like It's kind of like we just do it for the love.

They're not people in the game or work in music, they're just friends and people who get together and play. I am, right now, working on getting at least a three-piece band together.

Because currently I am working on a release for Brownswood, Gilles Petersen's label, and that is gonna be in the style of the " Chameleon. Like "Aquarian Voyage. That's what I have been doing overseas. Kind of like a Patrick Adams -type of vibe. Who else would you say has made an impression on you in the world where jazz and house meet? Theo inspired me on I can't really even say what perspective.

As I said, it was really late when I got introduced to house music. That was my introduction. Some house DJs I see, they have to play house non-stop — if they switch up, they can't do that, especially if they've got a huge crowd who just want their dance tempo, if you get what I'm saying. Theo, though, started just playing straight-ahead jazz, and the crowd, all young people, was going crazy.

I never saw nothing like that. And then he went on to play fusion, then more house, he was just playing all over the place. The thing about Theo is he takes chances, he don't care. That's what I like, that's what motivates me. I've been doing something with Alexander Nut and Eglo Records.

I been working on some stuff with Funkineven, and given it to him. But my motivation has been coming from Kyle Hall and them. They've been motivating me to start my own label; so I've just been working on my own music, preparing myself to start a label somewhere in the future. Yeah, I think so.