Stockhausen Aloys Kontarsky Christoph Caskel Karlheinz Stockhausen Kontakte For Electronic Sounds Pi

In Hans Keller asked him to introduce a broadcast of the work on BBC Radio and Cardew, a recent convert to Marxismseized on its comparative popularity as an Stockhausen Aloys Kontarsky Christoph Caskel Karlheinz Stockhausen Kontakte For Electronic Sounds Pi to condemn the composition as "a part of the cultural superstructure of the largest-scale system of human oppression and exploitation the world has ever known: imperialism " Cardew The last two performers, seated in the audience, apply resonant bandpass filters to the microphone outputs and distribute the resulting sounds to a quadraphonic speaker system. Triangle 4. Vocal music of my past sounds through time-windows into the vocal music of my present. Directed by Reinhold Friedl. It uses material from the Wikipedia article " Refrain Stockhausen ".

Length, tempi, etc. Zeitkratzer had the chance to work on this piece in Ljubljana in the Spring of , and tried to develop their approach to interpret the texts as precisely as possible, in the traditional way of score-reading.

As Stockhausen pointed out: "musical meditation is not sentimentality, but ultra alertness and -- in the lightest moments -- creative ecstasy. Directed by Reinhold Friedl. I want music. Originally composed for musical boxes, the work is played here by Dominik Susteck, organist at St. Peter's in Cologne. The recording features an unusual instrument.

Since the s, this Catholic chapel has strived to connect the church with contemporary art. Its organ, built by Willy Peter, was designed for contemporary music. The four-manual great organ and the three-manual choir organ has stops, including such unusual sound additions as siren, saxophone and percussion orchestra.

Susteck describes his interpretation of Stockhausen's work as, 'a frozen musical movement. The instrument no longer sounds like an organ but proves to be a colorful, agile and dynamic being. These works in effect separate the "form" from the "content" by presenting the performers with a series of transformation signs which are to be applied to material that may vary considerably from one performance to the next.

In Pole and three companion works Kurzwellen for six performers, Spiral for a soloist, and Expo for three , this material is to be drawn spontaneously during the performance from short-wave radio broadcasts Kohl , — The processes, indicated primarily by plus, minus, and equal signs, constitute the composition and, despite the unpredictability of the materials, these processes can be heard from one performance to another as being "the same" Kohl , Pole was composed in Bali in February , at that time under the working title of Duo Stockhausen , Between 14 March and 14 September , Pole was played and sung over a thousand times at Expo '70 in Osaka , Japan, in daily performances by twenty different musicians including the composer Stockhausen , Pole consists of a sequence of approximately events, grouped into seven sections divided in the score by wavy barlines.

Nearly static chords dissolve into melodies. There is some kind of peace inside this sounding space. In each chord, one note decides the duration of the chord by the dynamic level of the attack and its natural decay. Six times during the performance of the piece a varied refrain is appearing, disturbing or livening! The exact occurrences of the refrains are variable and determined by the players, thus shaping a version.

Pitched loud tongue clicks and called syllables are combined with many of the attacks. A certain amplification is used throughout.

The score is of a very special kind. It appears in two semi circles facing each other, each containing three groups of staves. A transparent strip with the six refrains printed onto it is fastened in the middle of the score. This strip is then moved into the position decided for each performance, thereby having the refrains appearing at different places in the composition each time. The score is dedicated to Judith Frehm Pisar. Two recorded performances of Mikrophonie I by the Stockhausen ensemble have been released, but only one of Mikrophonie II , though the two compositions have always appeared together, on different labels and in different formats.

The performers in the two versions of Mikrophonie I both of the Brussels Version are:. Fritsch, timer; Karlheinz Stockhausen, sound projection. Recorded 10 June Category:Compositions by Karlheinz Stockhausen. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Herbstmusik Oben und Unten Originale. Helms Nicolaus A. To the signs previously used in Prozession and Kurzwellen , Stockhausen adds a dozen new ones. An especially important one is the "spiral sign", consisting of a column of different combinations of four or five plus or minus signs bracketed by repeat marks.

In doing this, the performer is encouraged to employ visual and theatrical possibilities Stockhausen , 3—4, 13—14, 23— Because there are only seven "spiral" signs altogether, not every section contains one of them Vetter , Spiral is not ordinarily performed complete: the performer may end a version at any of the wavy barlines, and then for the next performance should resume where the previous one left off.

On the other hand, the end of the score is marked " da capo " so that, should a chosen starting point result in the end being reached too soon, the performer may continue again from the beginning.

Series Time S Reissued, s, LP recording, stereo. Mainstream MS Mainz: Wergo, Earle Brown Contemporary Sound Series. Wergo WER 2, 2, 2. Karlheinz Stockhausen. Kontakte for electronic sounds, piano and percussion. Refrain, for three performers.

Candide CE New York: Vox Records, Zyklus 2 versions , Refrain , Kontakte. CD recording. Zyklus, Refrain, Kontakte. After an initial attempt to notate the actions and implements proved impractically complicated, Stockhausen decided to categorize the sounds according to their perceived qualities: "groaning, " "trumpeting, " "whirring, " "hooting," "roaring," "grating, " "chattering, " "wailing, " "sawing, " "ringing, " "choking, " "cawing, " "clacking, " "snorting, " "chirping, " "hissing, " "grunting, " "crunching, " "clinking, " "tromboning, " "scraping, " etc.

Through this emphasis on subjectively perceived qualities, "For the first time a perceptual equivalent to totally organized structure has been discovered, and it is particularly significant that this has been done with very simple means. This successful fusion of abstract theory and expression makes Mikrophonie I a work of singular importance" Maconie , However, when it came to tam-tams, some were less suitable than others, and the assortment of implements used to excite the tam-tam in the original performances could be substituted only with difficulty, if the desired range of sounds was to be obtained Stockhausen , 95— Mikrophonie I was first performed in Brussels on 9 December The score is dedicated to the composer's godson, Alexander Xandi Schlee.

Mikrophonie II Work Number 17 , for choir, Hammond organ , and four ring modulators , like Mikrophonie I composed in moment form , also consists of 33 "moments", though, unlike the earlier work, their order is fixed in the score. The durations of these moments are made according to the Fibonacci series Frisius , The work combines the electronically produced sounds of the Hammond organ with vocal sounds from the choir through ring modulation to produce transformations that in many places achieve distortions evoking wizardry Frisius , Stockhausen's original idea had been to combine a choir with the tamtam from Mikrophonie I but the sounds proved too contrary, and so he settled on the Hammond organ instead Kurtz , Of course there was Allen Ginsberg, who recited a poem, using a few phrases that caused nervous giggles from some young ladies in the audience.

Allen Ginsberg was dressed in his usual formal dress for concert work: blue jeans, red shirt open at the neck, a jacket of sorts, even shoes. The evening was a triumph of organization. Includes photo of Charlotte Moorman stripping. Until this piece was believed to have been lost. Edition of Modern Silence presents Kontakte written by Karlheinz Stockhausen.

Kontakte was Stockhausen's first piece to use both electronics and traditional instruments together, marking a turning point in his career, when his music was beginning to show the influences of American avant-garde jazz and composers like John Cage. In Kontakte , live musicians play alongside a tape recording of percussion sounds that have been altered by different electronic devices i.

Stockhausen wanted the musicians to improvise over the prepared tape, but the musicians were at such a loss that Stockhausen eventually had to score the instrumental parts as well.

Only because of Stockhausen's complete understanding of electronic equipment, along with his creative genius, was he able to produce this masterwork, the first piece of music to unify vocals and electronics.

Wergo is now offering these gems from their early years on CD for the first time. Karlheinz Stockhausen's Momente , written for soprano, four choral groups and thirteen instrumentalists, was not designed as a fixed work with a clearly defined beginning, formal structure, and ending.

The instruments are grouped in a circle around the percussionist, and he will therefor turn around as he is playing through the dominant timbres. Amplification is utilized in this piece. This short description is enough to convey the understanding that there is so much more than just a straight traditional compositional process at work here. The score, though rigidly notated, allows for many variations, which the interpreter can decide, and no two performances will sound exactly the same, while at the same time the method of composition assures that there will be as much diversity and variation, within the given framework, as Stockhausen intended, while the 9 timbral groups also will appear, no matter where you start, or in which direction you chose to progress.

It is amazing! The spiral-bound score naturally also correspond, on a higher level, to the processes in infinite space, where the spiral galaxies move majestically through the void, and also to the principle of fractals, which also form spirally, and contain the signature of the whole in each little part. The individual singers or small groups of singers are to repeat each word a number of times, then move on to the next word. The instrumentalists have an instrumental score with short motifs too, treated in the same way.

The instrumentation is piano, wood blocks, celesta, antique cymbals, vibraphone and cowbells, so the percussive character lingers on. The sound is crisp and clear to me, even though Stockhausen notes that the spoken sounds in particular are not clear enough, due to the circumstances surrounding the recording process.

Nearly static chords dissolve into melodies. An especially important one is the "spiral sign", consisting of a column of different combinations of four or five plus or minus signs bracketed by repeat marks. In doing this, the performer is encouraged to employ visual and theatrical possibilities Stockhausen , 3—4, 13—14, 23— Because there are only seven "spiral" signs altogether, not every section contains one of them Vetter , Spiral is not ordinarily performed complete: the performer may end a version at any of the wavy barlines, and then for the next performance should resume where the previous one left off.

On the other hand, the end of the score is marked " da capo " so that, should a chosen starting point result in the end being reached too soon, the performer may continue again from the beginning. Most performances last between fifteen and twenty-five minutes, and Stockhausen did not authorise a full-length version until Michael Vetter convinced him to permit such a thing Vetter , —